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Reynolds Tavern

1

Reynolds Tavern

7 Church Circle

Built c. 1747 by William Reynolds, a hatter who also operated the tavern and lodging house, it is distinctive for its elaborate use of header-bond brick. The tavern was originally known as The Beaver and Lac'd Hat.

Anne Arundel County Court House

2

Anne Arundel County Court House

8 Church Circle

The third oldest courthouse still in use in Maryland, the county courthouse has had five major periods of expansion. Completed in 1824, it includes fire-proof construction techniques, such as masonry vaults. The most recent addition (1994-2000) added 240,000 square feet to the now restored 19th century building.

Jonas Green House

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Jonas Green House

124 Charles Street

Jonas Green, printer of the Maryland Gazette and subsequently his wife Anne Catharine Green and their sons, operated their print shop from here from the 1740s until 1786.

John Ridout House

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John Ridout House

120 Duke of Gloucester Street

Ridout House is among one of the earliest in a series of large gentry house construction in colonial Annapolis. John Ridout, secretary to Governor Horatio Sharpe, built his fine dwelling in 1764-65 at the time of his marriage to Mary Ogle, daughter of another colonial Governor, Samuel Ogle. The house features header-bond brick on both principal elevations.

Commodore Waddell House

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Commodore Waddell House

61 College Avenue

This English Queen Anne style house was built in 1881 for James Iredell Waddell, a Confederate Naval Officer. The design is most likely inspired by the architecture of British architects Richard Norman Shaw and Phillip Webb.

James Andrews House

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James Andrews House

16 Maryland Avenue

James Andrews, an Irish immigrant who owned a dry goods shop on Main Street, built this three-story Greek Revival style house between 1852 and 1858.

Gassaway-Feldmeyer House

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Gassaway-Feldmeyer House

194 Prince George Street

One of the finest examples of Italianate architecture in Annapolis, this distinctive dwelling was built in 1880 for Augustus Gassaway. In 1903, it was acquired by merchant, James Feldmeyer.

James Brice House

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James Brice House

42 East Street

Built between 1767 and 1773, this grand five-part Georgian plan house features header-bond brick and elaborate interior plaster work. James Brice kept a meticulous account book of its construction. Today, it is owned by the State of Maryland and is the headquarters of Historic Annapolis.